Birth Control

Table of Contents

Birth control is a method used to prevent unwanted pregnancy. It can also be used to treat other medical conditions.

There are varying methods which include reversible methods, barrier methods, and permanent methods. Each method has different possible health benefits and side effects.

What are the Benefits?

Preventing unwanted pregnancy is what birth control is for. But, there are also non-contraceptive benefits that you may not be aware of, such as:

What are the Different Methods?

There are different methods for birth control. These include reversible methods, barrier methods, and permanent methods. Deciding which method would be beneficial to you depends on your needs and lifestyle.

Reversible Methods

These reversible methods prevent the ovaries from releasing an egg. Which then prevents sperm from fertilizing the egg. The types of options available include:

  • The birth control pill
  • The patch
  • The vaginal ring

Another option is long-acting reversible contraceptives. This means you can receive it once and the effects last for a longer period.

Examples of this include the shot. This contains a hormone found in some birth control pills (progestin). You can get the shot administered in the doctor’s office once every three months.

Intrauterine Devices (IUDs) are ‘T’ shaped devices placed in the uterus. There are hormonal IUDs and Copper IUDs. You must have a healthcare professional place the device. Depending on the type of IUD chosen, it can remain effective for 3-10 years.

Barrier Methods

The barrier method works by blocking sperm from entering the cervix. This results in not fertilizing an egg. You can buy most of these at a local drug store:

  • Male condom
  • Female condom
  • Diaphragm
  • Sponge with spermicide

Lifestyle Methods

Making certain lifestyle decisions can lower the risk of unwanted pregnancy.

Some choose the fertility awareness method. This method is when a woman tracks her window of fertility and then abstains from sex during that period.

If you are breastfeeding you can use the lactational amenorrhea method (LAM). You can use this method until the baby has reached 6-12 months old. This method has very specific rules to be effective.

Permanent Methods

Permanent methods can be non-reversible that you can consider. These include female tubal ligation and male vasectomy.

Method

Types

Typical Failure Rate

Medication Name

Common Side Effects

Reversible

The Pill

7%

Safyral

Seasonique

Apri

Yaz

Jencycla

Nausea, headaches, spotting, mood changes, weight gain

 

The Patch

7%

Twirla vs. Xulane

Application site disorders, nausea, headache, weight gain

 

Vaginal Ring

7%

Nuvaring

Headache, decreased sex drive, menstrual cramps, breast tenderness, nausea, acne, weight gain

 

The Shot

4%

Depo-Provera

Irregular menstrual periods or no periods at all, headaches, Depression, acne,

weight gain,

Osteoporosis.

 

IUD

0.1-0.8%

Skyla, Paragard

Anemia, spotting, vaginal irritation, vaginal discharge, backache

Barrier

Male Condom

13%

Trojan, Skyn

 

Female Condom

21%

Uniq, P.S.

 

Diaphragm

17%

Nurx, Caya

UTI, vaginal irritation

 

Sponge

14-27%

Today Sponge

Toxic Shock Syndrome

Permanent

Tubal Ligation

0.5%

 

Vasectomy

0.15%

Lifestyle

Abstinence

100%

 

Fertility Awareness

2-23%

 

Lactation Amenorrhea

Unknown

 

Withdrawal

4-22%

How Can You Get Birth Control?

At The Rx Advocates, we can help you get birth control for yourself. We will work with you and your doctors. We will follow up with the pharmaceutical companies. And we will continue to help you once you are approved.

Please contact us to get help with your prescriptions today.


Sources:

  1. MedlinePlus. Birth Control. 2022. Available at Medlineplus.gov.
  2. My Cleveland Clinic. Birth Control: The Pill. July 21, 2020. Available at My.clevelandclinic.org.
  3. Chop. Managing Menstruation with Hormonal Contraceptives. Nov 19, 2019. Available at Chop.edu.
  4. Office on Women’s Health. Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). February 22, 2022. Available at Womenshealth.gov.
  5. Office on Women’s Health. Endometriosis. February 22, 2022. Available at Womenshealth.gov.
  6. Healthline. Everything You Need to Know About the Birth Control Patch. August 4, 2022. Available at Healthline.com.
  7. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Contraception. January 13, 2022. Available at CDC.gov.
  8. Drugs. Safyral: uses, dosage, side effects. September 21, 2022. Available at Drugs.com.
  9. Drugs. Twirla vs Xulane: How do they compare? March 31, 2021. Available at Drugs.com.
  10. Drugs. Nuvaring Uses, Dosage & Side Effects. May 24, 2022. Available at Drugs.com.
  11. Drugs. Depo-Provera (Injection Intramuscular). April 13, 2022. Available at Drugs.com.
  12. My Cleveland Clinic. Depo-Provera® (Birth Control Shot). May 12, 2021. My.Clevelandclinic.org.
  13. Drugs. Skyla. August 2, 2022. Available at Drugs.com.
  14. Paragard. What is Paragard? 2022. Available at Paragard.com.
  15. Medical News Today. Can you get pregnant using the pull-out method? May 39, 2020. Available at Medicalnewstoday.com.
  16. Drugs.com. Seasonique. June 14, 2021. Available at Drugs.com.
  17. Drugs.com. Apri. February 14, 2021. Available at Drugs.com.
  18. Drugs.com. Yaz. June 14, 2021. Available at Drugs.com.
  19. Drugs.com. Jencycla. August 30, 2022. Available at Drugs.com.

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